Evergreen Line of the SkyTrain Light Rapid Transit System

I was born in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan but relocated to British Columbia with my family when I was a toddler. While I was too young to recall all of the details I do know that we moved to the rural area of Port Coquitlam. The very small port town was a hub for CP Rail and other industries. Probably the most famous person to come out of this community was the world renowned Terry Fox. Not only did he and his family live just down the road from my family but I went to the same elementary school although a grade or two behind him.

The area in which I grew up was basically very rural, lots of forests leading into the nearby mountains. Close to where we lived there was an old quarry that eventually became the man made Lafarge Lake. This small lake then turned in to a park for the ever expanding developments that sprung up in the hills and mountains close by. Soon a community and recreation center was built across from the lake followed by a high school and a college. Lots of houses and townhouses sprung up in the foothills and before you knew it several high rise apartment complexes sprouted up as if from nowhere.

Forty years later my childhood so called “off-limits” playground of Lafarge Pit is quite the well developed parkland with everything one could ever need for easy access recreation. Given all of the other amenities that are very close by it only made sense to make Lafarge Lake the terminus station for the brand new Evergreen Line of the Light Rapid Transit Skytrain system.

Friday night I went for a quick walk down the street and I noticed that they were working on the elevated tracks for this driverless train and that they were only a couple of sections from completion. I snapped a couple of pictures and thought I would share them with you.

I live only a few blocks from this new transit arm but I will more than likely be moving out of the area before it is completed, not that I would use it even if it were completed before I left.

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They suspend individual sections, somewhere around 20ft long, and join those sections between the supports structures before moving the whole thing down the line.

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There are only a couple of support structures left to be spanned before the elevated section is completed, only a few days from now judging by the speed in which they are moving.